Tag Archives: Filipino food

#286 Buchi

Buchi (pronounced ‘BOO-CHEE) is a deep fried sticky dough filled with red bean paste or ube halaya (sweetened mashed purple yam).

A favorite snack or dessert on the Filipino table, the buchi balls are made of milled glutinous rice, shaped in small round balls,  filled with the bean paste, rolled in sesame seeds and then deep fried. The balls are often sold on the street with the buchi balls skewered on bamboo sticks.

Bon appetit!

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#283 Ube Roll

Ube roll is a light sponge roll which is baked like any other sponge cake or roll. The difference is the use of  ube or sweetened purple yam as flavoring for the sponge cake mix. 

The ube or purple yam jam can also be used as filling for the roll, but since the ube paste is heavier in consistency than the fluffy sponge roll good baking skills must ensure that the roll do not break during or after the baking process.

The Filipinos sweeth tooth is evidenced in this fluffy ube roll, which is a popular dessert in birthday parties, social gatherings or any festive Filipino table. Popular bakery and pastry chains or stores in the Philippines also sell ube roll with a variety of toppings such as icing and macapuno (glutinous coconut) strips.

Bon appetit!

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#270 Paksiw na Bangus

Paksiw na bangus or milk fish in vinegar stew is a classic fish dish in the Filipino kitchen. The recipe is simple and the ingredients are easily accessible.

The main ingredients include whole milkfish gutted and sliced, chopped ampalaya or bitter melon, slice ginger, slice or quartered eggplant (aubergine), hot green peppers, white vinegar , a bit of water and patis (fish sauce) to taste. All ingredients are combined and left to slowly cook and simmer in a deep pan. The native palayok or terracotta pots topped with fresh banana leaves are the best pot to cooked paksiw na bangus.

Bon appétit!

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#266 Puchero

Puchero is one of the many Spanish-influenced dishes borrowed by or adopted in the Philippine kitchen. Puchero is a type of stew prepared in other former Spanish colonies such as Argentina, Colombia and Uruguay. The dish is also known in Spain’s Andalusia and the Canary Islands. The name comes from the Spanish word “puchero” which means “stewpot.”

The specific preparation and ingredients of the dish vary by region. In Spain, puchero is a type of chickpea-based stew called a cocido. In the parts of Argentina, Colombia and Uruguay surrounding the estuary of the Río de la Plata, puchero is primarily meat-based, as chickpeas are less common in that region than in the Iberian peninsula.

The Filipino puchero or pochero is a delicious stew made from chicken, pork or beef. The basic ingredients are chickpeas, chicken, pork, chorizo sausage, onion, peppercorns, tomatoes, garlic, sweet potatoes, green onions and bok choy (a type of Chinese cabbage). The ingredients are combined and stewed just like similar meat and vegetable stews and left to simmer until the meat is tender. (Source: Wikipedia)

Bon appétit!

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#256 Sisig

Sisig is a Kapampangan (language in Pampanga province) term which means “to snack on something sour”. It usually refers to fruits, often unripe or half-ripe, sometimes dipped in salt and vinegar. It also refers to a method of preparing fish and meat, especially pork, which is marinated in a sour liquid such as lemon juice or vinegar, then seasoned with salt, pepper and other spices.

Sisig also refers to Sizzling Sisig, a Filipino dish made from parts of pig’s head and liver, usually seasoned with kalamansi and chili peppers. The dish is said to have originated from locals residents who bought unused pig heads from the commissaries of Clark Air Base in Angeles City, Pampanga. Pig heads were purchased cheap since they were not used in preparing meals for the U.S. Air Force personnel stationed there. An alternate explanation of its origin is that it is but an innovative variation on an older recipe, which is pork ears and jowl, boiled, chopped then marinated. (From: Wikipdedia)

Bon appetit!

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#195 Green Mangoes and Bagoong

What can be more deliciously tempting than green mangoes and bagoong (fish sauce)?

To many Filipinos unripe green mangoes and bagoong (fish sauce) is the ultimate sour-salty side dish that is a 100% winner in any dinner table. Especially pregnant women are known to crave for hilaw na mangga (unripe mangoes) and bagoong for the ultimate Pinoy snack.

Marinated mangoes sprinkled or with a dust of dried and crushed chilli peppers is another variant that goes best with coconut milk-based vegetable stews and meat dishes. For the bagoong, a shrimp or any fish-based sauce will do. For those with diet restrictions or high blood go easy on the bagoong as it has a high salt content.

Bon appétit!

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#23 Bagoong

Bagoong (pronounced as BAH-GO-ONG) is fermented fish or shrimp paste ( a variant called bagoong alamang), a ubiquitous sauce, side dish or accompaniment in the Filipino kitchen table.

Foreigners or the non-iniatated may find the smell repulsive, but it takes only a few tries to find and locate the yumminess of this saucy paste especially when eaten with Filipino meat dishes such as kare-kare, pinakbet (vegetable dish) or with green mangoes as a zesty salad. Bet your 10 dollars you’d be guaranteed finger-linking goodness!

Although on the salty side, bagoong adds a distinct flavor to common dishes. So be careful with the cooking measurements as this sauce might sharpen the saltiness of your dish.

Again in popular lingo, bagoong has its contributions such as in the expression: “Nabagoong ang ekonomiya ng Pilipinas dahil kay GMA.”  Translation: The Philippine economy has stagnated (na-bagoong) because of GMA (Gloria Macapapagal-Arroyo, sitting-duck president).

For Filipinos this is an unmissable sauce on their table, and is often brought to the farthest corners of the world as a tasty souvenir from the homeland.   

Mabuhay ang bagoong!

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#7 Red Eggs

Itlog na pula or salted red eggs is a no-no for heart and kidney patients as one red egg carries, perhaps, more than your required salt intake in a week’s time.

But for those with a higher salt threshold these eggs are superbly yummy with minced tomatoes, cucumbers, as toppings for bibingka (native rice cakes) and other salads that require a litte salty zest.

The red color simply serves to separate or distinguish the eggs from uncooked and non-salty ones and to avoid confusion in the market. Duck eggs are also often used for itlog na pula.

The eggs are marinated for weeks in dissolve salt, literally absorbing the salty concoction over time. Cooked and later dyed in red, it is a marvelous side dish on the  Pinoy’s kitchen table.

Mabuhay ang itlog!

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